What is your most valuable asset ?

Smarter Next Year   

The Science for a Smarter Happier You


Your most valuable asset as a CEO is not your employees, not your customers, not your 10 year plan: it is your brain. Like all assets it needs to be protected and grown. Smart people generally make better decisions, operate better businesses and are usually more successful in life. 

Here is the problem: The Center for Disease Control in the United States estimates that by age 40 half of the population start to show signs of mild cognitive impairment. Your executive functions, which are processed in your frontal lobe, in the front of your brain, are the first to start to decline.

            LIST OF EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONS


Goal Setting                Initiating        Flexibility                     Using Feedback                                            Inhibiting                     Self-monitoring                                              Executing                    Generalizing                                              Organizing                  Shifting                                                          Problem-Solving        Prioritizing                                                    Pacing                          Planning                                                    

Sequencing

Take a good look at this list. How important are these abilities to you in carrying out your duties as a CEO? How much more effective would you be if you could strengthen these areas; regardless of age.

All of the latest neuroscience has show that the brain is highly plastic and can be improved at any stage of life.

Smarter Next Year is a three hour, five part program

Value to Attendees: Attendees will leave understanding which components of increasing intelligence they have control over and the latest, evidence based, best practices to increase cognitive function and memory. They will leave with a 8 step action plan which they can immediately implement to improve cognitive ability and memory and the tools to measure this increase on an ongoing basis.